Using the Capability Inventory for municipalities

Using the Capability Inventory for municipalities

I was talking to Marino the other day and he told me he would like a special capability inventory for a municipality. I said that there is no need to have a special capability inventory, the basic pattern exposed in the original capability inventory should cover any organization. In fact he should just use the original one and perhaps add the elements that are missing. The basic pattern behind the capability inventory is to view every organizations output as delivering services. This view enables us to use the same basic elements across all organizations. I can relate to the fact that the pattern and elements looks unfamiliar because it does not follow the way one is used to visualize a municipality. To remedy any confusions I´ve designed a naïve example below.

Elaborating on the capability inventory for municipalities
Elaborating on the capability inventory for municipalities

In the example I´ve removed the elements in the envision and enable rows and focused on the engage row. The text in the capability elements are not capabilities rather they describe the activities one would perform using the capability to reach the business goals.

When you should use this

  • Whenever you set about using a capability model of your enterprise
  • Whenever you have a new business problem to consider

What you should consider when you use this

  • Using the capability inventory and mapping out the basic activities will give you a good hunch but it is not the complete constructs needed to design the business.
  • It took me about 15 minutes to whip up the example

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I’m currently in a process of changing my presentation design (the images shows what the new design looks like) for all my work. When I’ve stabilized the design and applied it across all canvases and related material I’ll link up the powerpoint to Slideshare.

License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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Post change log

2015-07-02: Published initial post

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The Capability Inventory

This model is part of my toolbox for working with capability architectures.

The Capability Inventory

I know that there is certain ways of naming a capability and also that there are other principles that people and I promote that you should adhere to when designing your capability map. Here I’ve taken some liberties in regards to those principles to make it easier to relate to the possible content in the boxes. This inventory is basically what I refer to as “functions as capabilities“, now there is certainly a way of mapping proper capabilities into this inventory.

The Capability Inventory Details 

Detailing production
Details of production capability

Philip asked about the production capabilities so I’ve detailed some parts of production (above) to show where they could be situated. The detailed inventory map also shows how one can reuse the original layout to keep things in view.

Details of the sales capability
Details of the sales capability

 

Details of the marketing capability
Details of the marketing capability

 

I have some more of these laying around in different formats and states of publicity. When I find the time I’ll update this post with more of these.

Download note: I’m currently in a process of changing my presentation design (the images shows what the new design looks like) for all my work. When I’ve stabilized the design and applied it across all canvases and related material I’ll link up the powerpoint to Slideshare.

When you should use this

  • Whenever you set about designing a capability model of your enterprise
  • When you need to understand what types of capabilities an enterprise can have
  • When you are set to create a target context map for microservice architectures

What you should consider when you use this

  • This is not “the complete, nor the correct” inventory of capabilities
  • There is no known right way of designing or describing a capability of an enterprise
  • There is techniques like reversing the names of processes and then consolidating them that could give you a fair hint of what capabilities you have in your enterprise
  • Look at other peoples capability inventories and take inspiration from those
  • The “best” capability inventory is the one you get enough people to use in their work
  • Develop the capabilities and the capability inventory in as wide spread community as possible
  • Continuously refine your capability inventory as you go
  • When naming capabilities think of each capability as part of a namespace
  • In the end it’s all about just doing it

License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Related

Post change log
2015-06-15: Published initial post
2015-06-20: Added the detailing view of production
2015-06-22: Added the detailing view of sales
2015-06-23: Added the detailing view of human management
2015-06-23: Updated the basic inventory of capabilities to reflect the sales capabilities directly
2015-06-24: Added the detailing view of marketing

The Inventory Model

This model is part of my toolbox for working with business architectures.

The Inventory Model

THE ENTERPRISE INVENTORY

 

The important thing to remember is to be agile minded in use of tools like this. So, when I say extendable I mean that this is definitely not all things that could or should be in the inventory. Reconfigure it in the X, Y or Z axis as you see fit for purpose and make sure to deliver something of value.

Note: I’m currently in a process of changing my presentation design (the image shows what the new design looks like) for all my work. When I’ve stabilized the design and applied it across all canvases and related material I’ll link up the powerpoint to Slideshare.

When you should use this

  • Whenever you set about depicting the greater enterprise

License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Post change log
2015-05-19: Published initial post

The Strategy Model

This model is part of my toolbox for working with strategic architectures.

The Strategy Model

The Strategy Model

 

Note: I’m currently in a process of changing my presentation design (the image shows what the new design looks like) for all my work. When I’ve stabilized the design and applied it across all canvases and related material I’ll link up the powerpoint to Slideshare.

When you should use this

  • Whenever you set about understanding the greater enterprise

License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Post change log
2015-05-12: Published initial post

The Scenario Canvas

This little canvas is part of my toolbox for detailing and documenting scenarios.

The Scenario Canvas

The Scenario Canvas

 

Note: I’m currently in a process of changing my presentation design (the image shows what the new design looks like) for all my work. When I’ve stabilized the design and applied it across all canvases and related material I’ll link up the powerpoint to Slideshare.

When you should use this

  • When designing target architectures I tend to use scenarios in conjunction with capabilities to help navigate the uncertainties of the future. (How this is done will be covered in a later post)
  • In the HBR article Living in the futures, Angela Wilkinson and Roger Kupers highlight how Shell has used scenarios.
  • In the McKinsey article The use and abuse of scenarios, Charles Roxburgh highlights some great insights into when and how to work with scenarios.
  • In the Forbes article Scenario planning and strategic forecasting, Jan Ogilwy presents a way of doing scenarios and also an interesting graph on what tools people use to peak into the future.

License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Post change log
2015-04-26: Published initial post

The Capability Canvas

Designing businesses is not a trivial activity. Having a simple structure that one can use to design and / or understand a capability makes designing business architecture so much easier.

The Capability Canvas

The Capability Canvas 2015-02. Click image to view powerpoint presentation on Slideshare
The Capability Canvas 2015-02. Click image to view powerpoint presentation on Slideshare

When you should use this

License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Change log
2015-02

I’ve cleaned up the descriptions of the elements to make it easier to work with.

  • PROCESS – Renamed “using” to “associated with ”.
  • SERVICE – Renamed “enabled” to “associated with ”.
  • INFORMATION – Renamed “produced, consumed and manipulated by” to “associated with ”.
  • TECHNOLOGY – Renamed “supporting” to “associated with ”
  • ORGANISATION – Changed spelling to US format.
  • VALUE – Renamed “attributed to” to “associated with ”
  • INVESTMENT – Renamed “we have done, do or plan to do on” to “associated with ”

The Brand Canvas

Designing and understanding brands and how the behave as figments of their own is hard enough. Having a simple structure that one can use to design and / or understand a brand makes designing businesses so much easier.

The Brand Canvas

The Brand Canvas 2015  – Click image to view powerpoint presentation on Slideshare
The Brand Canvas 2015 – Click image to view powerpoint presentation on Slideshare
When you should use this

  • In the HBR article 7 Steps to Deliver Better Customer Experiences Denise Lee Yohn gives excellent advise on designing for and from a customer perspective. The Brand Canvas and The Customer Journey are tools that will help you work through the 7 steps Denise is writing about.
  • In this article from IDEO about Brand Architecture you can understand how to consolidate and connect brands. The brand canvas can be used as a tool in the design of the architecture.

License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Iteration #6 of a new Business Model for MTB Stage Races

The Sponsoring checklist

As you get into it you need some help. Help can come in many forms, mostly what is required is network, money and knowledge. To get that you try to secure the support of sponsors in the form of investors. To ease the communication with the different types of sponsors a basic checklist can be utilized.

The checklist below is not specific to a situation where you are about to venture of into the wild or jumping out of a spaceship. This checklist has a dual purpose, it can be used to anchor and fund an idea in the heads of your business managers. The checklist is designed to be easy on purpose. You may think you need to cut a first class business case with rows and columns in a spreadsheet, but you don’t. What you need is to be clear about your intentions and get this information before the eyes of the right people.

A good rule of thumb is to rework the sponsoring request until it fits readable on one A4 paper.

The checklist

  1. Describe your organization – Describe the purpose of your organization, its goals and objectives, customer segments, investment areas, the number of people and financing.
  2. Describe the project in detail – Conduct a detailed description of the project you seek funding for. Be mindful to express the specifik purpose of the project, the time period, the budget requirements, the project lead and the critical success factors.
  3. Describe the partnership – Describe the type of cooperation you want to start with the sponsor. Be as specific as possible and list above all the support that would be needed for this cooperation and other factors you consider important in this type of collaboration.
  4. Describe the value of the enterprise – Detail the benefits you expect to realize if the project is successfully implemented.
  5. Anything else – In order to more quickly process your application for sponsorship, complete with additional information about the project that may be valuable in the decision.
  6. Contact info – Supply all the basic contact infos needed to get in touch with you. Name, E-mail, Phone, Address.